Artificial Intelligence

The Six Main Arcs in Storytelling, as Identified by an A.I.

The Six Main Arcs in Storytelling, as Identified by an A.I.

“My prettiest contribution to my culture,” the writer Kurt Vonnegut mused in his 1981 autobiography Palm Sunday, “was a master’s thesis in anthropology which was rejected by the University of Chicago a long time ago.”

By then, he said, the thesis had long since vanished. (“It was rejected because it was so simple and looked like too much fun,” Vonnegut explained.) But he continued to carry the idea with him for many years after that, and spoke publicly about it more than once. It was, essentially, this: “There is no reason why the simple shapes of stories can’t be fed into computers. They are beautiful shapes.”

Montreal is Leading the AI World Takeover

Montreal is Leading the AI World Takeover

Once limited to the realm of fiction, AI is now the technology shaping our world more than ever before. Montreal is at the center of this movement, with some saying it could become the Silicon Valley of AI. This may come as a surprise with all the other tech research and startup hubs out there. Why not New York, London, Boston, or even Silicon Valley? What does Montreal have that they don’t? As it turns out, the largest concentration of independent AI researchers in the world.

Sunspring | A Sci-Fi Short Film Written by Al Turns Out to be Hilarious and Intense

Sunspring | A Sci-Fi Short Film Written by Al Turns Out to be Hilarious and Intense

Ars is excited to be hosting this online debut of Sunspring, a short science fiction film that's not entirely what it seems. It's about three people living in a weird future, possibly on a space station, probably in a love triangle. You know it's the future because H (played with neurotic gravity by Silicon Valley's Thomas Middleditch) is wearing a shiny gold jacket, H2 (Elisabeth Gray) is playing with computers, and C (Humphrey Ker) announces that he has to "go to the skull" before sticking his face into a bunch of green lights. It sounds like your typical sci-fi B-movie, complete with an incoherent plot. Except Sunspring isn't the product of Hollywood hacks—it was written entirely by an AI. To be specific, it was authored by a recurrent neural network called long short-term memory, or LSTM for short. At least, that's what we'd call it. The AI named itself Benjamin.

Behind the AI-First Business Model

Behind the AI-First Business Model

Artificial intelligence has the potential to transform nearly every industry. But, AI functions in a way that doesn’t fit into the normal patterns of disruption and innovation.

This post is from a talk I’ve given a few times about how to think about data, scarcity and intelligence in order to understand what’s unfolding.

Part 1: Where We’ve Just Come From: The Big Data Business Model

The neural network algorithms that modern artificial intelligence uses, the ones that drive trucks autonomously or detect cancer more accurately than humans, have been known and existed for decades.

What have brought us to an inflexion point are the discovery of computers many orders of magnitude more powerful at executing the needed calculations, and, more importantly, the availability of large datasets to feed the algorithms.

Andrew Ng on Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Humanity?

Andrew Ng on Artificial Intelligence and the  Future of Humanity?

Work, job, play, privacy, communication, finance, war, and dating: algorithms and the machines that run them have upended them all. Will artificial intelligence become as ubiquitous as electricity? Is there any industry AI won't touch? Will AI tend to steal jobs and exacerbate income inequalities, or create new jobs and amplify human abilities at work -- or, both? How can the global population adjust to the changes ushered in by artificial intelligence and its capabilities? In light of these changes, how will we remake work, education, and community? Can we build it better than we did before?

Speaker: Andrew Ng
Andrew Yan-Tak Ng (Chinese: 吳恩達; born 1976) is a Chinese American computer scientist. He is the former chief scientist at Baidu, where he led the company's Artificial Intelligence Group. He is an adjunct professor (formerly associate professor) at Stanford University. Ng is also the co-founder and chairman of Coursera, an online education platform.

Interviewer: Jason Pontin Publisher Editor and Chief MIT Technology Review
 

The Designer’s Guide to Ai — a $70 Billion Industry by 2020

The Designer’s Guide to Ai — a $70 Billion Industry by 2020

As artificial intelligence gains popularity, designers will need to adapt. Here’s how to get started.

It seems like everyone wants to invest in artificial intelligence (AI). And it’s not just the tech giants: USAA is using AI to protect its users from identity theft and Under Armour has connected its health app, MyFitnessPal, to IBM Watson so users can get a more thorough read of their health.

AI is already a $15 billion dollar industry, according to the MIT Technology Review, with more than 2,600 companies developing their own tech, and the value of AI is reported to rise to over $70 billion by 2020. Because of AI’s business opportunities, hundreds of designers in digital agencies, people who were taught to create products and services that live on the Internet, are starting to build physical products that interact with us, respond to our moods, and make decisions for us. It’s a challenge that requires every skill they’ve learned, plus many they haven’t.